David W. Wright MD

Emory University

Dr. Wright, Professor, Vice chair of Innovation and Discovery in the Department of Emergency Medicine at Emory University School of Medicine is the Director of the Injury Prevention Research Center at Emory and Grady. He also directs the Emergency Neurosciences Laboratory, in the Department of Emergency Medicine. He is a board certified emergency medicine physician practicing at Emory affiliated hospitals and Grady Memorial Hospital, Atlanta’s premier Level 1 Trauma Center. He is actively involved in both the preclinical and clinical assessments of traumatic brain injury (TBI), stroke and other acute neurological conditions. He was the PI of the ProTECT III multicenter clinical trial of progesterone for acute traumatic brain injury and serves as the southeastern Hub PI for the Neurological Emergencies Treatment Trials network, and the Hub PI for the newly NIH funded Strategies To Innovate Emergency Care Clinical Trials Network (SIREN). He has extensive experience in the field of concussion and traumatic brain injury. He has participated in numerous TBI Guidelines development initiatives including the Brain Trauma Foundation’s guidelines for Moderate to Severe TBI, PreHospital TBI Guidelines, and Pediatric TBI Guidelines. He also serves on the CDC’s Pediatric Guidelines Committee, which is about to release its most recent evidence based guidelines. He served in the Atlanta VA’s Department of Rehabilitation Traumatic Brain Injury clinic, screening veterans for TBI during the backlog period in 2014 and is familiar with the VA screening tools. He is also an adjunct faculty in the Department of Biomedical Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology and works closely with an elite team of engineers at the Georgia Tech Research Institute where he participates in numerous concussion research and technology development endeavors. He is the Co-inventor of the DETECT technology, a rapidly deployable, easily administered, comprehensive system for the assessment of concussion and other neurological disorders. Dr. Wright, Professor, Vice chair of Innovation and Discovery in the Department of Emergency Medicine at Emory University School of Medicine is the Director of the Injury Prevention Research Center at Emory and Grady. He also directs the Emergency Neurosciences Laboratory, in the Department of Emergency Medicine. He is a board certified emergency medicine physician practicing at Emory affiliated hospitals and Grady Memorial Hospital, Atlanta’s premier Level 1 Trauma Center. He is actively involved in both the preclinical and clinical assessments of traumatic brain injury (TBI), stroke and other acute neurological conditions. He was the PI of the ProTECT III multicenter clinical trial of progesterone for acute traumatic brain injury and serves as the southeastern Hub PI for the Neurological Emergencies Treatment Trials network, and the Hub PI for the newly NIH funded Strategies To Innovate Emergency Care Clinical Trials Network (SIREN). He has extensive experience in the field of concussion and traumatic brain injury. He has participated in numerous TBI Guidelines development initiatives including the Brain Trauma Foundation’s guidelines for Moderate to Severe TBI, PreHospital TBI Guidelines, and Pediatric TBI Guidelines. He also serves on the CDC’s Pediatric Guidelines Committee, which is about to release its most recent evidence based guidelines. He served in the Atlanta VA’s Department of Rehabilitation Traumatic Brain Injury clinic, screening veterans for TBI during the backlog period in 2014 and is familiar with the VA screening tools. He is also an adjunct faculty in the Department of Biomedical Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology and works closely with an elite team of engineers at the Georgia Tech Research Institute where he participates in numerous concussion research and technology development endeavors. He is the Co-inventor of the DETECT technology, a rapidly deployable, easily administered, comprehensive system for the assessment of concussion and other neurological disorders.